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Study: Enactment Of Medical Cannabis Laws Associated With Lower Rates Of Violent Crimes

Study: Enactment Of Medical Cannabis Laws Associated With Lower Rates Of Violent Crimes

" ...medical marijuana dispensaries may actually reduce crime in the immediate vicinity."

By Laura

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Poll: Legalization Of Marijuana Is Inevitable

Poll: Legalization Of Marijuana Is Inevitable

Americans believe that the personal consumption and retail sale of cannabis will eventually be legal for adults.

By Laura

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Study: Inhaled Cannabis Relieves Symptoms Of Parkinson's Disease

Study: Inhaled Cannabis Relieves Symptoms Of Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson's is a progressive disorder of the central nervous system.

By Laura

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Study: Drug Dogs Most Likely To Err In Traffic Stop Scenarios

Study: Drug Dogs Most Likely To Err In Traffic Stop Scenarios

Dogs were far less reliable in scenarios designed to mimic real-world traffic stops.

By Laura

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Marijuana is the third most popular recreational drug in America (behind only alcohol and tobacco), and has been used by nearly 100 million Americans. According to government surveys, some 25 million Americans have smoked marijuana in the past year, and more than 14 million do so regularly despite harsh laws against its use. Our public policies should reflect this reality, not deny it.

Criminal marijuana prohibition is a failure. Over 20 million Americans have been arrested for marijuana offenses since 1965. NORML believes that the time has come to amend criminal prohibition and replace it with a system of legalization, taxation, regulation, and education.

Marijuana prohibition causes far more problems than it solves, and results in the needless arrest of hundreds of thousands of otherwise law abiding citizens each year. The NORML Legal Committee provides legal support and assistance to victims of the current marijuana laws.

For 40 years, NORML has served as a clearinghouse for marijuana-related information. Much of this information is now available online in NORML's Library.

Marijuana prohibition applies to everyone, including the sick and dying. Of all the negative consequences of prohibition, none is as tragic as the denial of medicinal cannabis to the tens of thousands of patients who could benefit from its therapeutic use.

NORML Blog, Marijuana Law Reform »

Working to reform marijuana laws
  • Read more by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    Using high–resolution MRI imaging, scientists identified specific changes in particular regions of the brain that they inferred were likely due to marijuana exposure. Notably, however, these changes did not appear to be associated with any overt adverse effects in subjects’ actual cognition or behavior.

  • Read more by Sabrina Fendrick, Director of Women's Outreach

    Tampa, FL – On Sunday April 13th, people came from all parts of the sunshine state to the to attend the first statewide Florida NORML conference at the University of South Florida.   While the most  critical topic of the day was Question 2 (Florida’s medical marijuana ballot initiative) to be voted on in the November election, there was also a diverse range of information presented by conference speakers such as student rights on campus, organizing and social media outreach. Panelists consisted of a group of nationally recognized advocates and some of […]

  • Read more by Allen St. Pierre, NORML Executive Director

    By Mitch Earleywine, Ph.D State University of New York at Albany Chair, NORML board of directors A new study claims to show small deficits on neuropsychological tests in college students who started smoking marijuana early in life. It might get a lot of press. Prohibitionists love to bang the drum of marijuana-related cognitive deficits, so I’d like NORMLites to know how to make sense of this sort of research. The recurring themes in this literature involve several alternative explanations that never seem to dawn on journalists. These results often arise […]

  • Read more by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    Those who report consuming cannabis two or three times per week are less likely to engage in at risk drinking behavior, according to data published online in The American Journal of Addictions. Researchers reported, "Among cannabis users, frequent cannabis use is associated with ... a lower prevalence of hazardous alcohol use when compared to occasional cannabis use."

  • Read more by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    Democrat Gov. Martin O'Malley today signed two separate pieces of legislation reforming the state's marijuana laws.

  • Read more by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    Lawmakers in some half-dozen states are poised to enact cannabidiol-specific legislation. But will these measures ultimately help patients?

  • Read more by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    State lawmakers have signed off on legislation, Senate Bill 2495/House Bill 2445, to reclassify and regulate industrial hemp.

  • Read more by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    The enactment of medicinal cannabis laws is not associated with any rise in statewide criminal activity and may even be related to reductions in incidences of violent crime, according to data published online in the journal PLoS ONE. "The central finding gleaned from the present study was that MML (medical marijuana legalization) is not predictive of higher crime rates and may be related to reductions in rates of homicide and assault," authors reported.

  • Read more by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    Maryland lawmakers have given final approval to legislation to eliminate criminal penalties for minor marijuana possession offenses. The forthcoming law reduces existing penalties for marijuana possession offenses involving ten grams or less from a criminal misdemeanor (presently punishable by arrest, up to 90 days in jail, a $500 fine, and a criminal record) to a non-arrestable, non-criminal fine-only offense ($100 fine for first-time offenders, $250 for second-time offenders).

  • Read more by Erik Altieri, NORML Communications Director

    Recently, Gov. LePage introduced a bill, LD 1811, to crack down on heroin and cocaine trafficking. While we disagree with his approach (doubling-down on the War on Drugs) Sen. David Dutremble and Rep. Corey Wilson have crafted a compromise proposal in committee that would address many of the hard-drug addiction issues Maine faces, while putting marijuana legalization on the ballot before Maine voters. Their proposal would create a three-legged stool that includes enforcement of high-level traffickers, increased funding for addiction treatment, and a referendum to legalize, tax and regulate marijuana […]







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