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legal marijuanaLegalization has been adopted (either in part or in full) by voter initiatives in a number of US jurisdictions: Colorado (2012), Washington (2012), Alaska (2014), Oregon (2014), Washington, DC (2014), California (2016), Maine (2016), Massachusetts (2016), and Nevada (2016).

mj plantMarijuana is the third most popular recreational drug in America (behind only alcohol and tobacco), and has been used by nearly 100 million Americans. According to government surveys, some 25 million Americans have smoked marijuana in the past year, and more than 14 million do so regularly despite harsh laws against its use. Our public policies should reflect this reality, not deny it.
 
NORML Blog

Read the NORML Blog for the latest news in marijuana law reform »

nlc logoMarijuana prohibition causes far more problems than it solves, and results in the needless arrest of hundreds of thousands of otherwise law abiding citizens each year. The NORML Legal Committee provides legal support and assistance to victims of the current marijuana laws.
 
us map selectFor 40 years, NORML has served as a clearinghouse for marijuana-related information. Much of this information is now available online in NORML's Library.
 

NORML Blog, Marijuana Law Reform »

Working to reform marijuana laws
  • Read more by Kevin Mahmalji, NORML Outreach Coordinator

    Local and state lawmakers are considering unduly restrictive rules and regulations for marijuana home grows.

  • Read more by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    Legislators in a number of states are pushing forward measures to delay the enactment of several voter-initiated marijuana laws. NORML Executive Director Erik Altieri called the efforts “an affront to the democratic process.” He added: “Voters have lived with the failings of marijuana prohibition for far too long already. Lawmakers have a responsibility to abide by the will of the voters and to do so in a timely manner.”

  • Read more by NORML

    To speed up the process one only has to get involved. It is easy to sit back and watch while progress occurs, but it is rewarding to be a part of such a movement.

  • Read more by Kevin Mahmalji, NORML Outreach Coordinator

    California voters approved the legalization of marijuana this past November, but for some cities, embracing the new law is going to take some time.

  • Read more by Justin Strekal, NORML Political Director

    With a majority of states now full swing into their legislative sessions, over 400 bills nationwide have been submitted that in someway, shape, or form address marijuana policies. Ranging from ending the criminal prohibition of marijuana to tweaks to legalized medical marijuana programs to better serve patients; clearly, inch by inch, we are winning.

  • Read more by NORML

    The National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine released a comprehensive report today acknowledging that “conclusive or substantial evidence” exists for cannabis’ efficacy in patients suffering from chronic pain, and sharply criticized longstanding federal regulatory barriers to marijuana research – in particular “the classification of cannabis as a Schedule I substance” under federal law.

  • Read more by Erik Altieri, NORML Executive Director

    So, after finally being put on the spot and questioned on the issue, we are no closer to clarity than we were yesterday. Time to keep contacting your Senators. If Sessions wants to be an Attorney General for ALL Americans, he must bring his views in line with the majority of the population and support allowing states to set their own marijuana policies without fear of federal intervention.

  • Read more by Justin Strekal, NORML Political Director

    On January 10th and 11th, the Senate Judiciary Committee will hold hearings on the nomination of Jeff Sessions to become the next Attorney General. Over the course of these two days, marijuana reformers and citizens alike from around the country will be calling members of the committee to have them ask a simple question: Does Sen. Sessions intend to respect the will of the voters in the majority of US states that have enacted to pursue alternative marijuana policies?