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NORML Blog, Marijuana Law Reform »

Working to reform marijuana laws
  • Read more by Allen St. Pierre, NORML Executive Director

    Dear NORML members and supporters, We all find ourselves this weekend at the precipice of the year’s most propitious date on the calendar for cannabis consumers and freedom lovers: April 20th. As always, there will be large public gatherings all around America (and other countries too) to celebrate the responsible adult use of cannabis. The day is a cultural phenomenon, with both substantial media output (some entire cable networks broadcast cannabis-centric programming and entertainment–like Comedy Central) and coverage of public celebrations (cities like Denver expect downtown public pot celebrations drawing […]

  • Read more by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    Using high–resolution MRI imaging, scientists identified specific changes in particular regions of the brain that they inferred were likely due to marijuana exposure. Notably, however, these changes did not appear to be associated with any overt adverse effects in subjects’ actual cognition or behavior.

  • Read more by Sabrina Fendrick, Director of Women's Outreach

    Tampa, FL – On Sunday April 13th, people came from all parts of the sunshine state to the to attend the first statewide Florida NORML conference at the University of South Florida.   While the most  critical topic of the day was Question 2 (Florida’s medical marijuana ballot initiative) to be voted on in the November election, there was also a diverse range of information presented by conference speakers such as student rights on campus, organizing and social media outreach. Panelists consisted of a group of nationally recognized advocates and some of […]

  • Read more by Allen St. Pierre, NORML Executive Director

    By Mitch Earleywine, Ph.D State University of New York at Albany Chair, NORML board of directors A new study claims to show small deficits on neuropsychological tests in college students who started smoking marijuana early in life. It might get a lot of press. Prohibitionists love to bang the drum of marijuana-related cognitive deficits, so I’d like NORMLites to know how to make sense of this sort of research. The recurring themes in this literature involve several alternative explanations that never seem to dawn on journalists. These results often arise […]

  • Read more by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    Those who report consuming cannabis two or three times per week are less likely to engage in at risk drinking behavior, according to data published online in The American Journal of Addictions. Researchers reported, "Among cannabis users, frequent cannabis use is associated with ... a lower prevalence of hazardous alcohol use when compared to occasional cannabis use."

  • Read more by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    Democrat Gov. Martin O'Malley today signed two separate pieces of legislation reforming the state's marijuana laws.

  • Read more by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    Lawmakers in some half-dozen states are poised to enact cannabidiol-specific legislation. But will these measures ultimately help patients?

  • Read more by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    State lawmakers have signed off on legislation, Senate Bill 2495/House Bill 2445, to reclassify and regulate industrial hemp.

  • Read more by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    The enactment of medicinal cannabis laws is not associated with any rise in statewide criminal activity and may even be related to reductions in incidences of violent crime, according to data published online in the journal PLoS ONE. "The central finding gleaned from the present study was that MML (medical marijuana legalization) is not predictive of higher crime rates and may be related to reductions in rates of homicide and assault," authors reported.

  • Read more by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    Maryland lawmakers have given final approval to legislation to eliminate criminal penalties for minor marijuana possession offenses. The forthcoming law reduces existing penalties for marijuana possession offenses involving ten grams or less from a criminal misdemeanor (presently punishable by arrest, up to 90 days in jail, a $500 fine, and a criminal record) to a non-arrestable, non-criminal fine-only offense ($100 fine for first-time offenders, $250 for second-time offenders).







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