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Georgia

Media Awareness Project Drug News
  1. US GA: Medical Cannabis Resolution Overwhelmingly Approved

    Times-Herald, 24 Apr 2016 - Delegates at the Third District Republican Convention last weekend overwhelmingly voiced their support for the expansion of Georgia's laws on cannabis/marijuana-derived medicine, and for allowing the medicine to be produced in Georgia. A resolution supporting expanding the number of conditions that can be treated with oil containing cannabidiol (CBD), a component of marijuana, and in-state cultivation of cannabis used to make the oil, passed with very little opposition at the convention, held April 16 in Newnan.
  2. US GA: Macon Lawyer Pleads Guilty In Federal Drug Case

    Macon Telegraph, 20 Apr 2016 - A Macon attorney admitted Wednesday she participated in a drug deal in the parking lot of a Church's Chicken restaurant on Hardeman Avenue, near Interstate 75 and downtown Macon, in June 2015. [name redacted], 36, pleaded guilty to possession of oxycodone and methamphetamine, with intent to distribute both drugs, during a hearing in U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Georgia.
  3. US GA: OPED: Government Power Invites Corruption

    Rome News-Tribune, 13 Apr 2016 - Sometimes the curtain is pulled aside, allowing us to see what's going on in the often-opaque worlds of government and finance. Such an occasion has been happening with what's being called the Panama Papers, released by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. It's going to take not months, but years, to wade through the estimated 11 million documents leaked from a Panamanian law firm that specializes in crafting tax shelters. But initial disclosures are both troubling and offer insight. "The documents reference 12 current or former world leaders, as well as 128 other politicians and public officials," CNN reported. Implicated, in particular, are associates of Russian President Vladimir Putin; FIFA, the global soccer governing body, 40 of whose officials were indicted in 2015 by the U.S. Justice Department on corruption charges; and Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson.
  4. US GA: OPED: DEA Should Get Real On Pot

    Rome News-Tribune, 13 Apr 2016 - Under the federal Controlled Substances Act, marijuana is classified as a Schedule I drug, which means it has no medicinal value and is highly addictive. But the Drug Enforcement Administration is, once again, considering moving it to a less restrictive category that better reflects both its danger and the undeniable facts on the ground - that nearly half the states in the nation allow the use of cannabis for medical purposes, and several allow it to be used recreationally. The DEA told lawmakers that it intends to make a decision by July.
  5. US GA: Bill To Halt New Treatment Centers

    Rome News-Tribune, 19 Mar 2016 - CHICKAMAUGA - Legislation placing a temporary moratorium on new narcotic treatment centers passed the Georgia House of Representatives, 169-0, and awaits the signature of Gov. Nathan Deal. The legislation was filed by Sen. Jeff Mullis, R-Chickamauga, out of concern over the growing number of centers alongside an increase in heroin addiction.
  6. US GA: PUB LTE: Treat Addiction, Don't Jail It

    Walker County Messenger, 09 Dec 2015 - Dear editor, Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different outcome. Addiction is an obsessive compulsive behavior that interferes with everyday life. For an addict to change they must change their people, places and things. Government has become so focused on the war on drugs and forgotten about the ongoing battle of addiction. Probation is not designed to help. We are just another number; another lost cause in the eyes of the state.
  7. US GA: LTE: Addicts, Dealers Are Not The Victims

    Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 25 Aug 2015 - I read with interest the article entitled "Rethinking lifetime prison sentences" (News, Aug. 23). The article is written as if the prisoners were the victims. The dealers did not pull the trigger that killed the addicts but, indirectly, they are responsible for their death. Maybe not a physical death, but one that robs them of their productive life. Eventually, the user will depend on the state and/or their family for their every physical need. The user chose to ingest the drugs and they should bear some of the burden. Many of the users finally figure it out, make a recovery, and become productive. I doubt this is true for dealers; the life is easy, the money is good, no taxes to pay, no up early and off to a real job. I believe the majority of the dealers did not intend to become a dealer, but in order to support their habit they began dealing.
  8. US GA: LTE: Marijuana Is Still Unproven Remedy

    Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 24 Aug 2015 - Although Georgia House Bill 1 allows medical marijuana for several severe medical conditions, it needs to be emphasized that none of these conditions have been shown to be helped by this approach, except for some instances of nausea and vomiting in people on cancer chemotherapy. I recently reviewed more than 200 articles in the medical literature back to 1950 on the efficacy of marijuana for many severe medical conditions, and found absolutely no evidence in controlled studies for any other documented benefits. Although I am very concerned about the severe difficulties of people who are now allowed to use medical marijuana, they need to be served by continuing studies of effective treatments for their afflictions, not being allowed to use medical treatments of totally unproven medical efficacy.
  9. US GA: PUB LTE: Sheriffs Obstruct Meaningful Reform

    Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 24 Jul 2015 - I think it is appalling that state Rep. Alex Atwood views House Bill 233, the Georgia Uniform Civil Forfeiture Procedure Act, as the best Georgia's elected leadership can do for its citizens ("Civil forfeiture reform at last," Opinion, July 17). Is a uniform report that state agencies must complete really the only step forward? If so, that is pathetic. What Rep. Atwood's piece did not say was Georgia sheriffs are exempt from efforts to rein in their abuses. Since only state law enforcement agencies are bound by the new law, not sheriffs, the forced removal of personal property on the side of the road from the whim of a Georgia sheriff will continue. This is why the Georgia Sheriff's Association allowed this bill to pass while defeating all other bills that might have made a real difference. As a Georgia taxpaying citizen and past police officer, I view the Sheriff's Association as extremely bad actors and am truly disappointed no one at the Georgia Legislature could pass real reform.