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Ohio

Media Awareness Project Drug News
  1. US OH: Minority Goals For Pot Market Raise Legal Questions

    Morning Journal, 23 Jun 2016 - Part of Ohio's new medical marijuana law that sets aside a piece of the state's budding pot business for minorities appears to be unconstitutional, legal experts told The Associated Press. The provisions were inserted into the fast-tracked bill at the request of Democrats, whose votes were key to its passage in both Republican-controlled legislative chambers. The law made Ohio the 25th state to legalize medicinal cannabis. It takes effect Sept. 8.
  2. US OH: Lawyers Share Questions Concerning Drug-Law Ethics

    Columbus Dispatch, 22 Jun 2016 - Ohio lawyers are inquiring about the legal ethics accompanying medical marijuana. A committee of the Board of Professional Conduct is examining the issue and expects to make a recommendation on an advisory opinion in August.
  3. US OH: PUB LTE: Medical-Pot Law Too Restrictive

    Columbus Dispatch, 21 Jun 2016 - I respond to the Sunday letter "State needs guidance on medical pot" from Thomas D'Onofrio. I don't think he should worry about anyone using medical marijuana. This bill was crafted by elected career legislators, who are also prohibitionists. I don't think any doctors are going to write people a prescription for medical marijuana unless they are on their death bed.
  4. US OH: Lawyer Questions Hamilton Pot Law

    Journal-News, 14 Jun 2016 - Medical Marijuana Ban Now Appears to Conflict With State Law HAMILTON - Hamilton City Council voted 5-1 last year to effectively ban in the city the sale of medical marijuana through its zoning codes, and Cincinnati attorney Mike Allen said it may have a legal issue since it will soon be legal in Ohio to prescribe medical marijuana in limited forms.
  5. US OH: PUB LTE: The Economics Of Legalizing Pot

    News Herald, 11 Jun 2016 - When the subject of legalizing marijuana comes up, there seems to be plenty of mixed emotions, clashing of opinion and even ambivalence of tolerance in our society. We generally disdain excessive use of alcohol and nicotine as anodynes - painkilling drugs or medicines - but a rigid line is drawn between hedonistic marijuana use and an almost Calvinistic condemnation of the drug. Currently, we understand that 25 states, including Ohio, allow the use of marijuana for the relief of chronic pain, and just four states for "recreational" escape.
  6. US OH: Kasich Signs Medical Marijuana Bill

    Morning Journal, 09 Jun 2016 - Ohio became the latest state in the nation to legalize medical marijuana after Republican Gov. John Kasich signed legislation Wednesday. The law allows people to use the drug in vapor form for certain chronic health conditions, while barring patients from smoking marijuana or growing it at home.
  7. US OH: PUB LTE: 'Better Meds' Don't Work For All

    Columbus Dispatch, 08 Jun 2016 - Doctors against medical marijuana should stop pretending present pharmaceuticals are any less dangerous. The shear ignorance and bias in many of the articles written against the legalization of medical marijuana - many of them by doctors no less - is astounding and shameful. They speak as if we don't already have medicines derived from opium, from which heroin, morphine, oxycodone and the like are derived, or the coca plant that produces cocaine (which led to the discovery of lidocaine, etc.), as well as dozens of other highly toxic and/or addictive herbs.
  8. US OH: OPED: Medical Marijuana Has Arrived In Ohio

    Morning Journal, 07 Jun 2016 - Lawmakers weren't bluffing when they pledged they would consider medical marijuana after an outside group's effort to legalize pot failed last November. Much of that push, of course, came from polls suggesting Ohioans favor medical marijuana, and from concerns that outsiders would again try for a more liberal marijuana law by amending the state constitution.
  9. US OH: Editorial: Leap Of Faith

    The Courier, 06 Jun 2016 - Lawmakers weren't bluffing when they pledged they would consider medical marijuana after an outside group's effort to legalize pot failed last November. Much of that push, of course, came from polls suggesting Ohioans favor medical marijuana, and from concerns that outsiders would again try for a more liberal marijuana law by amending the state constitution.