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2013 Enacted Legislation

California — SB 566
Summary: Reclassifies industrial hemp as an agricultural commodity; establishes regulations for licensed cultivation of the crop, but requires authorization from the federal government before such cultivation can move forward.

Colorado — HB 1317, HB 1318
Summary: Establishes regulations regarding the commercial production and retail sales of cannabis to those over age 21; proposes excise tax and sales tax rates for commercial production and retail sales of cannabis; tax rates must be approved by voters.

Colorado — SB 241
Summary: Creates a program within the Department of Agriculture to regulate the commercial production of industrial hemp. State-licensed producers are not required to also seek federal permission to engage in hemp production

Hawaii — HB 668, SB 642
Summary: Transfers the administration of the state's medicinal cannabis program from the Department of Public Safety to the Department of Public Health; increases the quantity of medical cannabis that may be possessed by qualified patients from three ounces to four ounces; increases the number of mature plants that a patient may cultivate from three to a total of seven. These changes take effect in January 2015.

Illinois — HB 01
Summary: Creates a state-licensed pilot program to allow for the production, distribution, and possession of medical cannabis for qualified patients who possess a physician's recommendation.

Kentucky — SB 50
Summary: Encourages state-sponsored hemp research; establishes regulations regarding the licensed production of hemp as an agricultural commodity. (Note: Became law without the Governor’s signature on April 5)

Maryland — HB 1011
Summary: Establishes an independent, 12-member medical marijuana commission within the state Department of Health; the commission will request applications from Maryland academic medical centers to operate 'medical marijuana compassionate use programs.

Maine — LD 1062
Summary: Expands the state’s list of qualifying conditions to include post-traumatic stress, inflammatory bowel disease (such as ulcerative colitis), and other debilitating movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease. Law took effect on September 28, 2013.

Nevada — SB 374
Summary: Establishes rules and regulations for the establishment of up to 66 medical marijuana dispensaries; also amends possession limits for qualified patients from one-ounce to two and one-half ounces and increases plant cultivation limits from three mature plants to twelve; establishes sales and excise tax rates for the retail sale of medical cannabis.

New Hampshire — HB 573
Summary: Creates a state-licensed program to allow for the production, distribution, and possession of medical cannabis for qualified patients who possess a physician's recommendation.

New Jersey — Senate Bill 2842
Summary: Amends state regulations to provide for the production and sale of multiple strains of cannabis and allows for the distribution of cannabis-infused edible products. Use of edible products will be limited to those age 18 or younger.

Orgeon — HB 3460
Summary: Establishes rules and regulations for the state-licensing of medical cannabis dispensaries.

Oregon — Senate Bill 281
Summary: Expands the state’s list of qualifying conditions to include post-traumatic stress. Law takes effect on January 1, 2014.

Oregon — Senate Bills 40, SB 82
Summary: Reclassifies marijuana offenses involving the possession of over one ounce, but less than four ounces of marijuana, from a felony offense punishable by up to 10 years in prison, to a Class B misdemeanor, punishable by no more than six-months in prison; reclassifies offenses involving the possession of less than 1/4 ounce of hashish from a felony to a Class B misdemeanor; reduces the maximum fine associated with civil violations involving the possession of less than one ounce of marijuana from $1,000 to no more than $650; eliminates the suspension of driving privileges for persons cited for possessing one ounce or less of cannabis.

Vermont — Senate Bill 157
Summary: Amends statewide regulations to for the Secretary of Agriculture, Food, and Markets to license qualified growers to cultivate hemp as an agricultural crop; eliminates previous language halting the issuing of license until there is a change in federal law.

Vermont — HB 200
Summary: Amends the penalty for the possession of one ounce of marijuana by a person 21 years of age or older from a criminal misdemeanor to a civil fine. The law took effect on July 1, 2013.