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Study: Medical Cannabis Access Associated With Decreased Use Of Opioids

Thursday, 31 January 2019

Medical Cannabis Decreased Opioids

Little Rock, AR: The enactment of medical cannabis access laws is associated with moderately lower levels of prescription opioid use, even after controlling for potentially confounding variables, according to data published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

A team of investigators from the University of Arkansas assessed prescription drug use data in a nationally representative sample of nearly five million Americans for the years 2006 to 2014.

In a finding that is consistent with those of several other studies, authors concluded: "Medical marijuana legalization was associated with lower odds of opioid use, chronic opioid use, and high-risk opioid use when controlling for many state-level and patient-level factors. ... These results suggest that MML (medical marijuana laws) could be one policy tool that may modestly decrease opioid use; chronic and high- risk opioid use in a landscape where pain management options are limited and opioid misuse and addiction are rising rapidly."

Observational studies have similarly reported that medical cannabis access states possess lower rates of opioid-related use, abuse, hospitalizations, and mortality as compared to jurisdictions without operating medical marijuana programs.

For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at (202) 483-5500. Full text of the study, "Impact of medical marijuana legalization on opioid use, chronic opioid use, and high-risk opioid use," appears in Journal of General Internal Medicine. Additional information is available in the NORML fact-sheet, "Relationship Between Marijuana and Opioids."