Loading
Donate

Relationship Between Marijuana and Opioids

Cannabis access is associated with reduced rates of opioid use and abuse, opioid-related hospitalizations, opioid-related traffic fatalities, opioid-related drug treatment admissions, and opioid-related overdose deaths

  • "We find fairly strong and consistent evidence using difference-in-differences and event study methods that states providing legal access to marijuana through dispensaries reduce deaths due to opioid overdoses. … We provide complementary evidence that dispensary provisions lower treatment admissions for addiction to pain medications. ... In short, our findings that legally protected and operating medical marijuana dispensaries reduce opioid-related harms suggests that some individuals may be substituting towards marijuana, reducing the quantity of opioids they consume or forgoing initiation of opiates altogether. … At a minimum, however, our results suggest a potential overlooked positive effect of medical marijuana laws that support meaningful retail sales."
  • "During the study period, 2736 patients above 65 years of age began cannabis treatment and answered the initial questionnaire. The mean age was 74.5 ± 7.5 years. The most common indications for cannabis treatment were pain (66.6%) and cancer (60.8%). After six months of treatment, 93.7% of the respondents reported improvement in their condition and the reported pain level was reduced from a median of 8 on a scale of 0-10 to a median of 4. ... After six months, 18.1% stopped using opioid analgesics or reduced their dose. ... Cannabis use may decrease the use of other prescription medicines, including opioids."

Cannabis access is associated with reductions in overall prescription drug spending

  • "We conducted a pragmatic historical cohort study to measure the effect of enrollment in a state-authorized United States' Medical Cannabis Program (MCP) on scheduled II-V drug prescription patterns. ... Our pragmatic preliminary study found that enrollment in the NM MCP was associated with significant reductions in scheduled II-V prescription drug activity and associated use of conventional pharmacies and prescribing providers. ... 34% of the MCP patients cease to exhibit any evidence of scheduled drug consumption and an additional 36% reduce the number of prescriptions filled for scheduled drugs by the last 6 months of our sample period. ... In conclusion, a shift from prescriptions for other scheduled drugs to cannabis may result in less frequent interactions with our conventional healthcare system, and potentially improved patient health."
  • "Using the variations across state MMLs between 1996 and 2014 of Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) this paper estimates the effects of MMLs on prescription drug utilization, with a focus on opioids. I find that MMLs lead to a $2.47 decrease in per person prescribed opioid spending among young adults (ages 18-39) over a year. Most of this decrease results from the intensive margin of use and MML states that allow home cultivation experience even larger decreases."
  • "Using quarterly data on all fee-for-service Medicaid prescriptions in the period 2007-14, we tested the association between those laws and the average number of prescriptions filled by Medicaid beneficiaries. We found that the use of prescription drugs in fee-for-service Medicaid was lower in states with medical marijuana laws than in states without such laws in five of the nine broad clinical areas we studied. If all states had had a medical marijuana law in 2014, we estimated that total savings for fee-for-service Medicaid could have been $1.01 billion."
  • "Using data on all prescriptions filled by Medicare Part D enrollees from 2010 to 2013, we found that the use of prescription drugs for which marijuana could serve as a clinical alternative fell significantly, once a medical marijuana law was implemented. National overall reductions in Medicare program and enrollee spending when states implemented medical marijuana laws were estimated to be $165.2 million per year in 2013."

Patients often use cannabis as a substitute for other controlled substances, including prescription medications, alcohol, and tobacco

Chronic pain patients are less likely to abuse medicinal cannabis as compared to opioids

Chronic pain patients are less likely to become depressed using medical cannabis