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Study: Medical Cannabis Dispensaries Not Associated With Neighborhood Crime

Thursday, 14 June 2012

Study: Medical Cannabis Dispensaries Not Associated With Neighborhood CrimeLos Angeles, CA: The establishment of medical cannabis dispensaries does not adversely impact local crime rates, according to a federally funded study published in the July issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

Investigators at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) examined whether the proliferation of medical marijuana dispensaries is associated with elevated crimes rates. Researchers assessed the spatial relationship between density of medical marijuana dispensaries and two types of crime rates (violent crime and property crime) in 95 census tracts in Sacramento, California, during the year 2009.

Researchers reported: "There were no observed cross-sectional associations between the density of medical marijuana dispensaries and either violent or property crime rates in this study. These results suggest that the density of medical marijuana dispensaries may not be associated with crime rates or that other factors, such as measures dispensaries take to reduce crime (i.e., doormen, video cameras), may increase guardianship such that it deters possible motivated offenders."

Authors acknowledged that their findings "run contrary to public perceptions" and that they conflict with public statements made by the California Police Chief's Association, which had previously claimed, "Drug dealing, sales to minors, loitering, heavy vehicle and foot traffic in retail areas, increased noise, and robberies of customers just outside dispensaries are ... common ancillary by-products of (medicinal cannabis) operations."

The UCLA is not the first study to dispute the allegation that brick-and-mortar dispensaries are adversely associated with crime. A 2011 study of crime rates in Los Angeles published by the RAND Corporation similarly concluded, "[W]e found no evidence that medical marijuana dispensaries in general cause crime to rise." However, shortly following its publication RAND removed the study from its website after their findings were publicly criticized by the Los Angeles city attorney's office.

Other analyses of crime statistics in the cities of Denver, Los Angeles, and Colorado Springs have separately disputed the notion that the locations of dispensaries are associated with elevated incidences of criminal activity.

For more information, please contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, "Exploring the Ecological Association Between Crime and Medical Marijuana Dispensaries," appears in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.






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