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Marijuana Arrests Decline In 2011, But Still Total Half Of All Illicit Drug Violations

Monday, 29 October 2012

Washington, DC: Police made 757,969 arrests in 2011 for marijuana-related offenses, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's annual Uniform Crime Report, released today. The total is a decrease from past years. During the years 2006 to 2010, police annually made over 800,000 arrests for cannabis violations.

According to the report, marijuana arrests now comprise one-half of all illicit drug arrests in the United States. Approximately 43 percent of all drug violations are for cannabis possession.

"As in past years, the so-called 'drug war' remains fueled by the arrests of minor marijuana possession offenders," NORML Deputy Director Paul Armentano said. "Cannabis prohibition financially burdens taxpayers, encroaches upon civil liberties, engenders disrespect for the law, impedes upon legitimate scientific research into the plant's medicinal properties, and disproportionately impacts communities of color. It's time to stop stigmatizing and criminalizing tens of millions of Americans for choosing to consume a substance that is safer than either tobacco or alcohol."

Of those charged in 2011 with marijuana law violations, 663,032 (86 percent) were arrested for marijuana offenses involving possession only. The remaining 94,937 individuals were charged with "sale/manufacture," a category that includes virtually all cultivation offenses.
By region, the percentage of marijuana arrests was highest in the Midwest (61 percent of all drug arrests) of the United States and lowest in the west, where marijuana violations comprised only 29 percent of total drug arrests.

On Tuesday, November 6, voters in three states -- Colorado, Oregon, and Washington -- will decide on statewide ballot measures that seek to allow for the personal possession and regulated distribution of cannabis for adults. In two states, Colorado and Washington, these measures are ahead in the polls by double digit leads.

Recent national polls by Gallup, Rasmussen, The Huffington Post, and Angus Reid show that more Americans now support legalizing the adult use of cannabis than support maintaining its prohibition.

For more information, please contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org.





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