Study: Marijuana Linked To Better Outcomes In Brain Injury Patients

Thursday, 11 February 2016

Study: Marijuana Linked To Better  Outcomes In Brain Injury Patients

Rieti, Italy: The recent use of cannabis is associated with improved outcomes in patients hospitalized with intracerebral hemorrhaging (ICH aka bleeding in the brain), according to data published online ahead of print in the journal Cerebrovascular Diseases.

An international team of investigators from Argentina, Italy, the Netherlands, and the United States evaluated demographic trends and patient outcomes in a cohort of 725 subjects with spontaneous ICH. Researchers reported that cannabis-positive subjects possessed "milder ICH presentation" upon hospitalization and presented "less disability" at discharge as compared to similarly matched patients who tested negative for cannabinoids.

Preclinical and observation trial data has previously indicated that cannabinoids may possess neuroprotective activity. Specifically, a 2014 UCLA study previously reported that Traumatic Brain Injury patients who tested positive for cannabis upon hospital admission possessed significantly increased survival rates as compared to patients who tested negative for marijuana.

For more information, please contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, "Prior cannabis use is associated with outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage," appears in Cerebrovascular Disease.