Welcome To The NORML Women's Alliance


The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), the nation’s oldest and most well respected grassroots marijuana law reform organization, is pleased to announce the launch of the NORML Women’s Alliance.
The NORML Women’s Alliance is a nonpartisan coalition of prominent, educated, successful, and geographically diverse professional women who believe that cannabis prohibition is a self-destructive and hypocritical policy that undermines the American family, sends a mixed and false message to our young people, and destroys the cherished principles of personal liberty and local self-government.
Says NORML Executive Director Allen St. Pierre: “The prominent role of women in the effort to end marijuana prohibition is pivotal, necessary, and long overdue. According to recent national opinion polls by Gallup and others, the dramatic rise in the public’s support of marijuana law reform is being driven primarily by an increase in support among America’s women. The NORML Women’s Alliance will bring a contemporary approach to the public policy debate, and will proudly represent the interests of modern, mainstream women who believe that the negative consequences of marijuana prohibition far outweigh any repercussions from marijuana consumption itself.”
Charter members of the NORML Women’s Alliance include: NORML Foundation chair and film producer Ann Druyan, attorney and political activist Jessica Corry, editor Shelby Sadler, best-selling author Barbara Ehrenreich, Beverly Hills NORML director Cheryl Shuman, NORML Foundation board member Jeralyn Merritt, Esq., cannabis activist and author Mikki Norris, Cannabis Action Network and Berkeley Patients Group founder Debby Goldsberry, NORML board member and director of Oregon NORML Madeline Martinez, law professor Marjorie Russell, and former ACLU president Nadine Strossen. This founding group of women also includes medical physicians, researchers, business leaders, editors, publishers, mothers, grandmothers, and great grandmothers.
The NORML Women’s Alliance holds the following positions:
1. The NORML Women’s Alliance believes that the fiscal priorities of marijuana prohibition are wasting billions of dollars on a failed policy.
2. The NORML Women’s Alliance believes that marijuana prohibition violates states’ rights, and improperly expands the reach of government into the families and personal lives of otherwise law-abiding citizens.
3. The NORML Women’s Alliance advocates for an open, honest conversation about marijuana with America’s youth that is void of all propaganda and misleading information.
4. The NORML Women’s Alliance endorses the science-based evidence regarding the therapeutic applications of medical marijuana as well as the continuation of research into the subject.
5. The NORML Women’s Alliance strongly opposes the sexual exploitation and objectification of women in pot-culture and business marketing.
“A marijuana policy that fosters children selling marijuana en mass must immediately change and be replaced by one that effectively stops children from trafficking in marijuana,” says Sabrina Fendrick, coordinator of the NORML Women’s Alliance. “The NORML Women’s Alliance seeks to replace a failed, tax coffer-draining and child endangering 73-year old cannabis prohibition with functional, tax-producing and youth-friendly cannabis policies consisting of legal and social controls that are not at all dissimilar to our existing and ever-evolving alcohol policies.”
Further information about the NORML Women’s Alliance is available online here.

0 thoughts

  1. Aren’t these “groups” within Norml for people who have similar interests to organize according to their skills and strengths in order to take action towards the same goal as the heading of NORML? What’s the problem?
    [Editor’s note: One assumes you’ve never attended a NORML national conference or a local chapter meeting, because if you have, you likely wouldn’t wonder why there is a need to have more women involved in cannabis law reform. Further, the participation of women in cannabis law reform also needs to be respectful and non-sexually exploitative.]

  2. For God’s sake…this is not a gender issue. This is something we all can get behind, and there is safety in numbers. Count your blessings that women and the middle class will move mountains, because complainers always fall on deaf ears. Let’s get on a united band wagon and roll it towards prohibitionists/
    obstructionists.

  3. jesus…..dudes, to all who are sensitive about this man/woman thing.what the hell about the “we need a mens allience” crap.its ok that the women gather for the all important legalization of a most awesome herb. it will help us all. like norml has said before, if their are more women to step out an join the good fight….whats the friggen issue. especially if they get to have their personal stories heard by important people about their sucessful life while enjoying herb. what seems important is that the truth will be heard from more of the people who enjoy cannabis in their life!just maybe some of us dudes ought to jump up an do more for the cause……myself included….its not about man or women….its about “us” having cannabis in “our ” lives.

  4. welcome ladies…all of you. may your voices be heard and, your groups be many. thank you for steppin out.assemble and, break bud for us all….

  5. Earl’s Song
    I’ve seen their mothers at the social service office,
    The children of the prohibition
    Playin in the prison waitin room
    Cause their daddy’s caught token on the corner again
    Its 50 years and its still in every town from the heartland to the borders
    & just who is this a helping, cause it sure aint helpin them?
    The children of the prohibition.
    Justify. Justify.
    Justify. Justify. Why?
    (guitar, bridge:)
    Time changes ways of thinkin’ we all know
    about those kids smuggled in with the contra band
    Bad guys just cant get away with this no mo
    First please justify why we can’t decide
    Carlos Michelle Bob Marley speak silent brave and tall.
    Twist one up and shout out the song.
    Justify, Justify, Why?
    Why can’t ya buy a doobie at a mari juana bank?
    instead of from some hoodlum named Downtown Frank?
    Justify. Justify. Why?
    Hear this cry, justify, why.
    So hear the voices loud and clear
    We don’t want to hide under rocks no mo’
    We just want the prohibition to end
    instead of givin U.S.A. revenue to organized crime
    27 billion bills may not seem that bad,
    to incarcerate the dreams that we had.
    Justify, Justify, Why?
    Freedom changing ways of thinkin’
    in the land of Mr. Lincoln that’s what we say
    Let’s have a 4/20 day!
    Children of a revolution, refusing further prohibition.
    Want it to talk about it Now.
    If you want to talk change,
    start with justifying how?
    Justify, Justify Why?
    Try to go ahead and tell me this makes sense,
    The senate disapproves, with all confidence,
    Turning backs on a natural remedy cure
    our environment cant take this shit no more. NO.
    Shutting our eyes to all we know,
    when one God given plant can change this deal ya know.
    Justify, Justify, Why?

  6. Aren’t these “groups” within Norml for people who have similar interests to organize according to their skills and strengths in order to take action towards the same goal as the heading of NORML? What’s the problem?
    [Editor’s note: One assumes you’ve never attended a NORML national conference or a local chapter meeting, because if you have, you likely wouldn’t wonder why there is a need to have more women involved in cannabis law reform. Further, the participation of women in cannabis law reform also needs to be respectful and non-sexually exploitative.]
    NO, I have never had the pleasure of attending, but have wanted to and tried to get there. I am a low income nearly housebound FEMALE mmj patient. I do however, get involved with activism by participating online (such as here) have formed a charity to provide meds for free to low income patients and actively call my government officials when appropriate. I feel my comments are no less valid here.
    [Editor’s note: Great. Consider getting involved online via NORML with like-minded women who care about cannabis law reforms.]

  7. Yea, Why should we be criminalized for wanting to feel better when we’re elderly, disabled,and in pain? This is a natural herb we should be entitled to grow and utilize in order to avoid the use of adictive opiates. There is no need to participate in criminal culture. Those who can afford it or choose not to grow can participate in taxable growing income for the people. It’s obvious that the government can control other drugs, alcohol, guns,every other concievable crime,and tax them. Why not something as benign as this herb?

  8. Yea, Why should we be criminalized for wanting to feel better when we’re elderly, disabled,and in pain? This is a natural herb we should be entitled to grow and utilize in order to avoid the use of adictive opiates. There is no need to participate in criminal culture. Those who can afford it or choose not to grow can participate in taxable growing income for the people. It’s obvious that the government can control other drugs, alcohol, guns,every other concievable crime,and tax them. Why not something as benign as this herb?

  9. it finally feels like home…..don’t forget me..I’m in Boca Raton, FL..let’s hookup…wedzik@mindspring.com…ready to go to Colorado…..waiting on money…6 months in Colorado…6 months in Florida…for me….have access to (hireable)work hands if needed….i am a disabled chronic pain female patient with quite similar ambitions!!!! And because of my health and needs want to not only help myself, but put together a place people like me will feel they are right at cosy home!! and with all the professional perks so people all round will visit on a regular basis for generations…then we can expand to Florida…when we finsih changing the laws here…..and making it SO MUCH better for the peoples here!!! that’s my goal…hook up with me if your interested…..

  10. I am so glad to see a NORML Women’s Alliance. So much of weed culture is dude culture as this article points out:http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/blogs/sexist/2009/09/23/weed-culture-is-boob-culture/
    This organization is desperately needed as it provides a platform for social justice that recognizes the many voices that go unheard. If we are to really make waves in the movement for decriminalization and legalization, we must make an honest effort to recognize that for so long issues relating to multiculturalism (including gender) have not been addressed, which has ultimately hindered our success. I look forward to being a part of this much need alliance.

  11. Thanks #62 Abby!
    Well said, I have always been frustrated with the “weed culture is boob culture.” The first time I was exposed to it was for on High Times festival flyer. That flyer turned me off so deeply. I call it sadly the sex-ploitation of marijuana.
    Some of us believe that the marijuana reform movement is a movement – not a movie! It is not fantasy, it is real life! It is social justice movement that needs to respect the rights, opinions and dignity of all. Everyone needs to feel comfortable and safe within the movement. I frankly do not feel safe nor comfortable when sex-ploitation is used as a tool.
    I am glad to hear about the NORML Womens alliance.

  12. I agree with everyone that says NORML needs a Women’s Alliance. I joined CANORML last month. I would like to become active, but how does one do this, when they are in fear co-workers may find out, which could lead to unwanted drug screens, etc.? Has anyone else dealt with this?
    FWIW–After MMJ, I was able to go off my pain medication, the anti-nausea medication I had to take with the pain medication AND I was able to not take NSAIDs after the pain medication. I have been able to decrease my HRT, and have been decreasing the amount of Klonopin I am taking (have been on for 20 yrs). I was Rx’d MMJ after have major surgery, about one month out, when I was tired of having nausea from my pain medication, and was tired of taking an anti-emetic to cope with it.
    Can I say, if my liver could speak, it would be thanking me?
    I think it’s a crime this plant is illegal.

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