Oregon: Lawmakers Pass Measure To Expand State’s Medical Cannabis Program To Include Patients With Post Traumatic Stress

Oregon: Lawmakers Pass Measure To Expand State's Medical Cannabis Program To Include Patients With Post Traumatic Stress

Salem, OR: State lawmakers have approved legislation, Senate Bill 281, to allow patients with post-traumatic stress to be eligible to engage in the therapeutic use of cannabis.

Members of the Oregon House of Representatives on Thursday voted 36 to 21 in favor of the measure. Senators had previously endorsed the bill in April by a 19 to 11 vote. The measure now goes before Democrat Gov. John Kitzhaber for consideration.

The bill expands the state’s existing medical marijuana program, initially enacted by voters in 1998, to include post-traumatic stress as a state-qualified illness for which marijuana may be recommended.

To date, only three states – Connecticut, Delaware, and New Mexico – specifically allow for the use of cannabis to treat symptoms of post-traumatic stress.

Clinical trial data published in the May issue of the journal Molecular Psychiatry theorized that cannabinoid-based therapies would likely comprise the "next generation of evidence-based treatments for PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder)."

For more information, please contact Erik Altieri, NORML Communications Director, at (202) 483-5500, or Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org.