Study: Medical Cannabis Access Associated With Reduced Opioid Abuse

Thursday, 16 July 2015

Study: Medical Cannabis Access Associated

Santa Monica, CA: States that permit qualified patients to access medical marijuana via dispensaries possess lower rates of opioid addiction and overdose deaths, according to a study published by the National Bureau of Economic Research, a non-partisan think-tank.

Researchers from the RAND Corporation and the University of California, Irvine assessed the impact of medical marijuana laws on problematic opioid use, as measured by treatment admissions for opioid pain reliever addiction and by state-level opioid overdose deaths.

"[S]tates permitting medical marijuana dispensaries experience a relative decrease in both opioid addictions and opioid overdose deaths compared to states that do not," authors reported. They found that women over the age of 40 showed the most significant decrease in problematic opioid use.

Data published in 2014 in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine reported that the enactment of statewide medicinal marijuana laws is associated with significantly lower state-level opioid overdose mortality rates. "States with medical cannabis laws had a 24.8 percent lower mean annual opioid overdose mortality rate compared with states without medical cannabis laws," investigators reported.

Overdose deaths involving opioid analgesics have increased dramatically over the past decade. While fewer than 4,100 opiate-induced fatalities were reported for the year 1999, by 2010 this figure rose to over 16,600 according to an analysis by the US Centers for Disease Control.

For more information, please contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study: "Do Medical Marijuana Laws Reduce Addictions and Deaths Related to Pain Killers?" is available from: http://www.nber.org.