Study: Marijuana Consumers Less Likely To Suffer From Metabolic Syndrome

Thursday, 19 November 2015

Study: Marijuana Consumers Less Likely To Suffer From Metabolic Syndrome

Miami, FL: Those who consume cannabis are 50 percent less likely to suffer from metabolic syndrome as compared to those who do not, according to findings published online ahead of print in The American Journal of Medicine. Metabolic syndrome is a group of risk factors, including high blood pressure, high blood sugar, unhealthy cholesterol levels, and abdominal fat, which are linked to increased risk of heart disease and adult onset diabetes, among other serious health consequences.

Investigators from the University of Miami, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine analyzed the association between cannabis use and metabolic syndrome in a cohort of nearly 8,500 subjects aged 20 to 59 who participated in the 2005-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Researchers classified participants as suffering from metabolic syndrome if they possessed more than three of the following symptoms: elevated fasting glucose levels, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, elevated systolic/diastolic blood pressure, and increased waist circumference.

Among subjects with no history of cannabis use, 19.5 percent met the criteria for metabolic syndrome. By contrast, 17.5 percent of former users and only 13.8 percent of current users met the criteria.

"Among emerging adults, current marijuana users were 54 percent less likely than never users to present with metabolic syndrome," investigators reported. Specifically, mean fasting glucose levels were significantly lower among current marijuana users as compared to never users, while waist circumference was significantly lower among males who reported current marijuana use as compared to those with no cannabis use history.

"These findings have important implications for the nation as marijuana use becomes more accepted and we simultaneously face multiple epidemics of obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes," authors concluded.

The findings are consistent with those of previous observational studies showing an inverse relationship between cannabis use and diabetic markers, and support population data showing that those who use cannabis typically possess smaller waist circumference and lower body mass index than those who do not.

For more information, please contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, "Metabolic Syndrome among Marijuana Users in the United States: An Analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data," appears in The American Journal of Medicine.