Support for Legalization Remains Strong

There have been a number of national surveys released over the last few months measuring the public’s support for marijuana legalization, confirming a majority of Americans continue to favor ending prohibition by legalizing and regulating marijuana.

While one of those polls (Gallup) did register an unexpected decline in support for legalization between 2013 and 2014 (a decline within the survey’s statistical margin of error, meaning it may not reflect an actual drop in support), the poll still found 51 percent support; and several other polls continue to find an increasing majority of the public nationwide support full legalization. And because of the demographics of this issue, that support should only continue to grow over the coming years.

General Social Survey

The most important of these latest surveys may be the General Social Survey, a national survey conducted every two years, that some consider the most reliable of the many national surveys. The survey involved interviews with 1,687 respondents between March and October of 2014, and found 52 percent support full legalization, with 42 percent opposed, and 7 percent undecided. This is the first time they have found majority support for full legalization, and the level of support represents a 9 point gain since they last asked the question in 2012.

GSS has been tracking support for legalization since 1974, when support stood at only 19 percent, before falling during the Reagan years to a low of 16 percent by 1990. Support has gradually climbed since 1990, although it was only at 32 percent as recently as 2006, rising 20 points in the last decade.

Pew Research Center

The Pew Research Center’s ongoing marijuana polling found 53 percent support nationwide for marijuana legalization in March of 2015, with 44 percent opposed. This includes 59 percent support among Democrats and 58 percent among self-described conservatives; but only 39 percent support among Republicans. Pew has recorded an astounding 11-point jump in support between the years of 2010 and 2013.

Sixty-nine percent of those polled believe alcohol is more harmful to the user than marijuana. And while 62 percent oppose public marijuana smoking, 82 percent have no problem if people smoke marijuana in their homes, and 57 percent say they would not be bothered if a marijuana store opened in their neighborhood.

Also, nearly half of all adults in the country (49 percent) say they have tried marijuana, with 12 percent using marijuana during the preceding year.

CBS News Poll

In a new poll released just before April 20, CBS News continued their periodic evaluation of the public support for legalizing marijuana, finding 53 percent of the public nationwide now favor ending prohibition, the highest level of support they have ever found. When CBS first surveyed the public in 1979, they found only 27 percent support. Revisiting the issue again starting in 2009, support levels had risen to 41 percent, finally reaching a slight majority (51 percent) by 2014. This latest finding is consistent with several other national polls.

Gallup Poll

Gallup first polled the American public about their support for legalizing marijuana in 1969, the year before NORML was founded, and determined the support level at only 12 percent. This number rose to 28 percent by 1977, before beginning a decline, falling to 23 percent by 1985. Support then again began to rise gradually over the next 25 years, until finally reaching 50 percent in 2011. Gallup found support peaking at 58 percent in 2013, before showing a decline to 51 percent in 2014. (Those numbers are within the 4 percent margin of error for their telephone survey of just over 1,000 respondents; and it is the only poll that has found a decline in support since 2013.)

Beyond the Beltway

Another recent survey of 1,032 interviews (with a margin of error of 3.05 percent), released in by Beyond the Beltway, a collaboration between the Benson Strategy Group and SKD Knickerbocker, found that 61 percent of the public currently support full legalization, with regulated sales as in Colorado and Washington, while 39 percent disagree. This is the highest national support level yet reported. Even 48 percent of Republicans and 45 percent of self-identified conservatives, said they support legalization. The support nationwide for eliminating the possibility of arrest and jail, and substituting a small fine, enjoyed the support of 72 percent.

Third Way

A poll released in December of 2014 by a Washington, DC think tank called Third Way found support for full legalization at 50 percent, while 47 percent remained opposed. Interestingly, the poll also found 67 percent of those surveyed support Congress enacting a bill providing states the right to legalize marijuana without federal interference (the de facto Obama policy), establishing what they called a “safe haven” for those states wishing to move forward with legalization.

While 64 percent of Democrats and 52 percent of self-identified conservatives favored legalization, only 32 percent of Republicans agreed. The survey also confirmed a gender gap remains, with 52 percent of men supporting legalization, but only 45 percent of women.

Quinnipiac University Colorado Poll

A survey of 1,049 Colorado voters taken in February of 2015 shows that two years after Colorado voted to legalize marijuana, a solid majority of the public continue to support the new law. The survey found that 58 percent of Colorado voters support keeping pot legal, while 38 percent are opposed to the new law. There is no evidence of “buyers’ remorse” among the voters in Colorado.

The gender gap continues, with 63 percent of men in support, but only 53 percent (but still a majority) of women. The poll also found the usual generational gap, with 82 percent of voters ages 18-34 favoring it, while only 46 percent support among those 55 and above.

Survey USA Colorado Poll

After a year of legalized marijuana in Colorado, in a survey conducted for the Denver Post by Survey USA and released in late December 2014, 90 percent of those who had initially voted for legalization in 2012 would still do so today; and 95 percent of those who opposes the initiative would still oppose it today. Amendment 54 passed with 55 percent support.

Interestingly 12 percent of those interviewed said friends or family visiting from out of state had asked to visit a recreational marijuana shop. Twenty-two percent of respondents reported they currently use marijuana, with 70 percent of those saying their level of use had remained the same since the new law took effect. Seventy-eight percent of respondents ranked smoking marijuana as their favorite method of use; while 15 percent favored “vaping”, and 5 percent favored edibles.

Forty-five percent of current users say they get their marijuana from a recreational dispensary; 24 percent from a medical dispensary; 18 percent from a friend; 7 percent grow their own; and 6 percent continue to rely on a black-market dealer.

Because of the small numbers of voters asked their views on marijuana (175), the poll has a 6-7 percent margin of error.

Quinnipiac University Poll in Three Swing States

According to a March 2015 poll by Quinnipiac University, marijuana legalization is likely to become a crucial issue in three swing states in the 2016 presidential elections. Fifty-one percent of Pennsylvanians, 52 percent of Ohioan and 55 percent of Floridians report they favor legalization, a level of support higher than that registered for any of the current presidential candidate, including Hillary Clinton, Jeb Bush, Chris Christie, Rand Paul, Mario Rubio and Ted Cruz.

As any legitimate pollster will tell you, this data is accurate within a statistical range, depending on the number of people polled and the method of polling. So it is not perfectly precise data by any means, and is at best a snapshot of support at a particular moment. But it is nonetheless valuable as a gauge over time as to which direction the country is headed on a particular issue, and with marijuana legalization, support remains strong and the direction appears headed even higher.

http://news.marijuana.com/news/2015/04/support-for-legalization-remains-strong/

37 thoughts

  1. There is no question whatsoever that the people of this country want to end marijuana prohibition. It is a complete disgrace to lockup hundreds of thousands of otherwise law-abiding Americans because of racist laws based on outright lies.

    The real question is: When are the Senators and Congressmen going to carry out the will of the people and do their jobs? Will they continue to accept the rule of their corporate masters or show the courage and ethical behavior we expect of those we elect?

    How many more good Americans will suffer needlessly because of outdated policies that have no basis in science and everything to do with racism, greed, and in some cases total ignorance?

  2. To those who understand, personally, Legalization is the logical choice.

    The arguments against legalization are empty,
    with the most common being the ‘gateway’ aspect…

    The thing about the ‘gateway drug’ argument,
    is that, if the lower rung of a ladder is removed, the next lower rung becomes the lowest…

    The ‘gateway drug’ argument also implies, concretely, that the problems with cannabis have little to nothing to do with its own properties, and therefore must be soured with the negatives of the compounds which are, in and of themselves, negative.

    The lies of prohibition, and the equating of cannabis and heroin, wherein, cannabis is commonly seen partaken by one’s peers, and it is clearly not as it has been depicted to them, so, their logical progression is to fail to trust the propaganda and so they question the terms and policies of other drugs, and THIS
    THIS is what causes the ‘gateway effect’,
    the misinformation.

    Stop lying to the children and all aspects of the ‘gateway effect’ will cease to be.

  3. @Ben – When I was young I tried other drugs; like cocaine, LSD, Peyote, Mushrooms, alcohol, and a few others. I admit I started with marijuana which, to some, would strengthen their argument that it is a gateway drug. However, the only reason I ever tried anything else, after having tried marijuana, is because once I learned that the Govt had been lying about the dangers of marijuana, I figured they were lying about the other drugs too… Further, another big part of the reason I tried other drugs is because the dealers encouraged me to try them.

    That was about 40 years ago. Now, I use only marijuana via a vaporizer. I realized the other illegal drugs were really dangerous but that marijuana was not. There is no doubt that they Govt propaganda regarding marijuana is one of the causes of people trying other drugs!

    If only they would finally be honest I believe the use of truly dangerous drugs would be drastically reduced.

  4. “I am not an advocate for frequent changes in laws and constitutions. But laws and institutions must go hand and hand with progress of the human mind. As that becomes more developed, more enlightened, as new discoveries are made, new truths discovered and manners and opinions change, with the change of circumstances, institutions must advance also to keep pace with the times. We might as well require a man to wear still the coat which fitted him when a boy as civilized society to remain ever under the regimen of their barberous ancestors.” – Thomas Jefferson

  5. Unfortunately, the reefer madness and prohibitionist scaremongering has not yet been undone nationally. If the network news shows would air pro-cannabis specials like CNBC, MSNBC, CNN, History, H2, the legalization drumbeat could become louder than the prohibitionist prattle.

    Maybe we’ll see this begin in the fall television season with the new show about cannabis that NBC is supposedly going to air, that is if it’s not yet another one of those laugh-at-the-stoner shows with undertones of fear the dope pushers, lumping cannabis in with the plethora of much more dangerous drugs, both legal and illegal.

  6. I hadn’t been checking, was intrigued to see the Denver Post/Survey USA finding that 78% of users prefer $moking, 15% aping, 5% Edibles. Took a while to start publishing those data, now sizable public for first time starting to notice the DISTINCTIONs between $moking and Vaping.

    Still missing so far: indication that anyone– 1%?– understands the technique for Vaping with an Extended-Drawtube One-Hitter (far enough from your eyes that you can watch what you’re doing with that lighter!)– for some, possibly, a practical hybrid BETWEEN $moking and Vaping, because after 19 seconds or so of holding the flame far enough down below utensil opening that the herb on the screen toasts but does not combust, you can move it up closer and glow off the tasty cellulose carbohydrate that has remained after you first vaporharvested out the precious cannabinoids.

    Okay, maybe 1% out there even knows how to teach anyone else how to Vape with a One-Hitter? Manners, opinions and methods change as Jeffy reminded us. Make, market, mentor.

    PS. I had been using cheapo Chinese lighters for years, happened to find an abandoned still-usable Bic, found that unlike the Chinese which have a lever-adjustment for flame height, the Bic has no adjustment, only one flame height, and that quite reliably an inch high, but if you tried to Vape with it as described above things get pretty hot by 19 seconds in! Well obviously the Bic is designed for the $moker whose concern is to get their $ig or Doobie lighted in a wind or wherever, and just keep Burning from then on. Rather than save Money like us modest Vapers do and light up lentamente in windsafe interiors.

    So buy the well-levered Chinese, and use a half–Inch flame an Inch below the crater opening! Happy Vapey!

  7. I hadn’t been checking, was intrigued to see the Denver Post/Survey USA finding that 78% of users prefer $moking, 15% aping, 5% Edibles. Took a while to start publishing those data, now sizable public for first time starting to notice the DISTINCTIONs between $moking and Vaping.

    Still missing so far: indication that anyone– 1%?– understands the technique for Vaping with an Extended-Drawtube One-Hitter (far enough from your eyes that you can watch what you’re doing with that lighter!)– for some, possibly, a practical hybrid BETWEEN $moking and Vaping, because after 19 seconds or so of holding the flame far enough down below utensil opening that the herb on the screen toasts but does not combust, you can move it up closer and glow off the tasty cellulose carbohydrate that has remained after you first vaporharvested out the precious cannabinoids.

    Okay, maybe 1% out there even knows how to teach anyone else how to Vape with a One-Hitter? Manners, opinions and methods change as Jeffy reminded us. Make, market, mentor.

    PS. I had been using cheapo Chinese lighters for years, happened to find an abandoned still-usable Bic, found that unlike the Chinese which have a lever-adjustment for flame height, the Bic has no adjustment, only one flame height, and that quite reliably an inch high, but if you tried to Vape with it as described above things get pretty hot by 19 seconds in! Well obviously the Bic is designed for the $moker whose concern is to get their $ig or Doobie lighted in a wind or wherever, and just keep Burning from then on. Rather than save Money like us modest Vapers do and light up lentamente in windsafe interiors.

    So (oops sorry I mean therefore) buy the well-levered Chinese, and use a half-Inch flame an Inch below the crater opening! Happy Vapey!

  8. Marijuana legalization make it legal for the people to smoke, eat, and otherwise consume marijuana for recreational and medical purposes . And also studies found it beneficial in curing various medical problems like including pain, nausea and loss of appetite etc.,
    Marijuana legalization has popular in the United States with huge change in stats describing its support from 12% in 1970 to 51% in 2014.
    Brandsy a premium branding company offer the services to make legal marijuana products brands in targeted market. With us you can define your brand image well in the marijuana industry.

  9. @ Miles,

    Back in the ’70s I too tried some of the harder stuff–coke, acid, peyote, MDA, ludes–seems like somebody always had something.

    But my gateway drug was alcohol. I never smoked cigs; and I started smoking pot about three years after I had already been drinking.

    I still don’t smoke cigs–tobacco cigs–and no longer drink . . .

    Regarding the polls in the above article, I am so happy with the turning of the tide. (I figured the down tick in the Gallup poll had something to do with the midterm elections, when conservatives went to the polls and Dems generally stayed home. Not sure I completely trust Gallup anyway, would like to see the way they word their questions.)

    Alas, no one has ever called me about my opinion in any of those polls; if they had, I’d been one of those 19% in 1974.

  10. @TheOracle,

    I can tell you that my conservative mom-in-law, after watching CNN’s 3-part special on MMJ, has changed her tune a bit. She was a nurse before she retired, so knew pot was less harmful than many other things, including alcohol. But a couple of years of watching Fox News suddenly turned her against MJ. That is, until this past week . . . my mouth dropped when my wife told me about her recent change of opinion.

  11. @Evening Bud,
    If the pen is mightier than the sword, than today we can say the syndicated ratings from those who attend the White House Press Conference are mightier than the Controlled Substances Act… And whatever scholarships they give in the backround. As much as Obama joined in mocking CNN at the annual dinner he was in Dr. Sanjay Gupta’s Weed 3. (Despite the “boos” I thought he was funny when he made fun of CNN… But he needs to watch Jon Stewart: it’s hard to distinguish Obama’s sarcasm from his regular tone of rebuttal).
    Point is, not only does this “Weed” series break the boundaries of fear that create the mindset required by many Americans to even watch Fox news…
    But our legislators are watching too, and are breaking the same walls of fear in their mind built by years of misguided parentally reinforced propaganda because parents would rather LIE to their children than bail them out of jail…

    Congressman Elijah Cummings who represents the district in Baltimore experiencing civil unrest says we need to have an “inclusion revolution.” Cummings also represents committees that decide whether some marijuana legislation gets to the floor for a vote. Watching a Congressional investigation of the ONDCP, I have seen his views change from the “tough on crime” kind if black Congressman who voted for the C.S.Act of 1970. With the appointment of Loretta Lynch as Attorney General, and Obama’s agenda to correct corrections… That is to end the disproportionate incarceration of People of color in our “Justice” system, I believe it inevitable that our leaders will be forced to reconcile and “correct” their own views on marijuana policy.
    I agree with Oracle that we need more press from the press on what marijuana, or even drug policy in general, is doing to our nation, and would add that the C.S.Act is at the root of our socioeconomic inequality.

    Eric Holder left office without descheduling. It’s time to let Loretta Lynch know what 45 years of bad marijuana policy has been doing to the peace, equality and progress of our great nation.

  12. I agreed with many of the others with regard to legalizing Canabis . I’m not against it because those whom I had talked to informed me that it is good for treating pain, not just minor pain but those people suffering with severe pain of the back, neck, legs , and arms . Those with such pain that they can barely do anything for themselves . My wife has such a need for this treatment for her pain . The medication that she takes barely goes to the pain . She has two back surgeries and a neck surgery . The older she gets the worst the pain. As medical use I support legalizing canabis

  13. @Evening Bud – Kudos to your mom-in-law!

    I only wish my brother who is very very anti-marijuana (not for any real reason, he simply buys into the old Govt lies and propaganda) would show as much common sense. He absolutely refuses to even consider that marijuana is anything other that what the Govt has been saying it is for so many years. I can’t even mention the word or subject around him without him getting mad and condescending. It’s really pretty pathetic and has caused a huge rift between us.

    The fact that I am extremely healthy at age 60, and have never had any trouble with the law (like Obama I haven’t got caught), and had a successful career in electronics and computers does nothing to sway his negative view of all things cannabis.

    I played a game of chess with him after smoking a joint. He figured I had no chance but I won. Well, after winning he said I got lucky – yeah right… I offered to play him another game but he declined!

  14. Email continues: Other States has already legalized Cannabis (1)for Medical Purpose , and (2) for Social uses . Legalizing Cannabis can help so many sick people especially those suffering with severe pain . I watch my wife everyday trying to do simple things such as getting out of bed , washing us , trying to cook a simple meal .The pain starts on her causing her to stop whatever she’s doing . The pain is so severe sometimes she screams . Although she take strong medication and has taken different ones they fail to go to the pain causing her sometime to TAKE MORE THAN SHE SHOULD . PLEASE LEGALIZE CANNABIS . NO EVERYONE AS THE SHERIFF MIGHT INDICATES IS A DRUG USER OR A VOILATOR OF SUCH A SUBSTANCE . LOOK AT WHAT IT CAN DO TO SICK , ILL, AND THOSE PEOPLE SUFFERING WITH SERVER PAIN . I WORKED SEVERAL YEARS AGO AS A CNA . PATIENTS TOLD ME THAT THEY WOULD RATHER DIE , THEN TO SUFFER WITH PAIN . BECAUSE , WHY , THE PAIN IS SO SEVERE THAT THEY CANNOT HELP THEMSELVES . THEY PAIN HAS TAKEN OVER THE WILL TO LIVE . AGAIN , PLEASE LEGALIZE CANNABIS .

  15. @Julian, I completely agree with your points. My Rep is due for another call on this matter, and my Senators, too, for that matter.

    BTW, I hope Lynch does the right thing on this. Perhaps because Obama has been hands off with the four legalizing states, that may be a sign that she will consider rescheduling pot . . . hope so.

    @Miles,

    Yes, I definitely give her credit for shaking the Fox News cobwebs outta her head on this one.

    Sorry to hear about the rift with your brother–brothers can be like that. My brother started out as a pot smoker, in the military, but after he was discharged, he began drinking more. These past two decades he’s been far more of a drinker than pot smoker (just the opposite of me). I think it was partly due to his paranoia of being drug tested. But, his son recently told me that he’s partaking in pot more and more lately–may have something to do with his impending retirement.

    BTW, congrats on your chess victory vs your bro. I am an avid board gamer myself, love to take a few hits while exercising my brain for fun. Take care.

  16. Campaigners should be able to help get the truth out regarding cannabis, unless the opponent in the election has LEO in the pocket.

  17. @Alvin,
    Welcome to NORML. Im very sorry to hear about your wife’s struggle to manage her pain. I recommend you invest in a good vaporizer and a small coffee grinder. Vaporizers don’t produce the smell that smoked cannabis does, which will allow your wife the privacy most women prefer.
    The other day I was texting my lazy @$$ brothers in Austin to get them to register in favor of the medical marijuana bill currently in committee here in the state of Texas. (See http://www.texasnorml.org for more details). I told them “be brief and polite. State your name and the city you are registered to vote in. Say I support HB3785 and HB507.” They called me back laughing, “What could possibly be your selfish reasons for legalizing pot?” I answered back, “Our nephew has epilepsy. Another nephew has chrone’s disease. So does our niece. Those are three great reasons to legalize marijuana in the State of Texas and beyond. Do you really need any another reason?”
    (The laughing stopped… Well for THEM, just calling my brothers out for acting like a douche made ME laugh). I know they were poking fun, and if growing my own building materials out of hemp sounds like a selfish reason to legalize cannabis then we need to study the additional benefits of legalization and open our eyes and break the fear like Governor Hickenloper of Colorado recently did. It disturbs me when people who love smoking weed convince themselves of selfish reasons not to email or call their Congressman. We must educate our brothers and our Congressman forever to end prohibition once and for all.
    “I’m not mad at my brothers, but at the ones who set them up.”
    -Robert Nesta Marley, lyrics to “Time Will Tell.”

  18. @ Julian,

    Sometimes I think people are simply afraid to call a public official and admit that they support legalization. I know that the first time I did it, I suddenly felt a hint of paranoia when they asked me my name and what city I lived in.

    I’ve gotten over that fear since then, and readily tell them. Though I suppose there is always the chance they will relay that info to the local police, I think we are past that point in our society, especially with the poll numbers we see of late. So I think it’s more a matter of them verifying that it’s indeed one of their constituents calling, something they often do on many other issues.

  19. @Evening Bud– “Impending retirement”– maybe precisely now your brother needs a kinda Evening Budding of his talents, and those Manyfingered thinkweed buds can help him figure out interesting pro-reforestation things to do with his remaining earthtime, including plant anti-drought hemp (Brownspliff program).

    If his thingk turns out to be drafting or painting, consider Grandma Moses started that career at 78, made $millions and lived to 101.

    Millions of now living human individuals will learn to use ca. 700 cannabinoid vapetokes a year each, in a way to energize previously unexplored talents that keep them busy (i.e. exercised, especially HANDS) enough to live beyond age 100– and there may be 500 million centenarians worldwide by 2050, and 90% of them will get their LEE life extension exercise using a walkstick (dancestick)– so get busy harvesting, trimming dead branches (regional fire prevention) and making mostly 36″ but also longer and shorter “canes” (yes you can make them out of cane/bamboo, and there is a wikiHow.com article on how to make a hardwire-handled version out of CANNABIS stalks).

    Some high-art varnished-wood walksticks, often with a scenic burl at the gripping end, are now $elling on line for over $100 each, good luck with yours!

  20. @Evening Bud – Regarding that chess game with my prohibitionist brother, I think I proved my point and it really bugged him! To play a good game of chess, especially against someone who is totally straight and highly educated, one must be able to accurately: analyze, plan, rely on memory, be creative, and be motivated enough to make it happen. These are all things that people who have never tried it fail to realize that we (cannabis consumers, potheads, whatever) are still very capable of!

    After 45 years of using cannabis, I have never came anywhere close to acting the way people are depicted of acting in the old propaganda films like “Reefer Madness”. Further, I have never met a single user, and I’ve know quite a few in my life, that is anything close to the fictional characters created by the genius comic duo: Cheech and Chong.

    It is really hard to get people to change their mind when they choose to ignore the evidence that stares them right in the face. Chris Christie, as one extreme example (extremely fat headed), is still propagating the “gateway drug” idiocy. Is anyone reading this planning to vote for that fool if he ends up running for president? I really don’t like Hilary much, but in a match up between those two, Hilary wins. That said, I really hope we get better choices before the next big election.

  21. @Mexweed,

    That’s a quite prescient comment on your part, because my brother is an artist; teaches art in one of the local high schools. I think it will be a good change for him, retirement, may just reintroduce him to the joys of the bud (instead of the bottle).

  22. Miles, you’re so right. I remember doing more than a few stupid things when I was drunk. (Looking back, I can’t believe some of the stupidity.) I have never done anything like that when stoned. Truthfully, the only things I miss about beer is the taste, and the social buzz. Other than that I don’t like anything about booze anymore.

    Most of the older people I know these days seem to be coming around to the idea that pot is nowhere near as dangerous as the old movies used to show. And if you pin them down, they’ll even (sometimes reluctantly) admit that the effects of booze are usually much worse than anything they ever saw with a “pothead.”

  23. Talk about injustice!!! Have you people heard about this?

    Prohibition is responsible for many horrible instances of human rights abuses, and the sexual assault of a teenager at the hands of a cop who used a small amount of cannabis as an extortion tactic, is a sickening example.

    Nebraskan law enforcement officer, Cory Cooper, discovered a small amount of cannabis during a traffic stop, and proceeded to use it to extort a teenager into performing sexual acts on him. After forcing her into the back of his patrol car, trapping her there, he ordered her boyfriend, present at the time, away from the scene and made him wait while the officer assaulted the teen under threat of arrest and the jailing of her boyfriend.

    Horrifyingly, the rapist cop took a plea deal and will not be charged with a felony conviction (as he should have been), will not have to register as a sex offender (as he should have to), and at the time of this writing, he is still a certified law enforcement officer in Nebraska (though he was fired from his position as deputy).

    If she was my daughter, I think I’d be tempted to arrange to have that cop taken care of properly! It wouldn’t be pretty.

  24. @Miles, I note you and your brother agree that chess is good training for rational thinking, the tragedy has been that through the centuries most people thought of it as a game that consisted of able-bodied adults sitting around for long periods of time. Fortunately to the question, Where’s the action?– an answer is available.

    1. Start chess at an earlier age– infants and toddlers.

    2. Combine more action into it– in the form of physically moving large heavy pieces around.

    If you google up Large Outdoor Chess Sets you’ll see plastic Staunton design sets selling for hundreds of dollars. I saw one for $599.95 in a Hammacher-Schlemmer catalogue. On “Wikiversity.org/Essential Preschool Part I: Ecc-Education Toys” you can find a cognitively adequate design for large outdoor chess pieces made by combining small pieces of scrap lumber and dead branchwood (no one will get paid for killing a tree). @Evening Bud’s brother, an experienced art teacher, might be able to set up a workshop manufacturing stuff like this, a wonderful outlet for creative energies after a GMV good morning vapetoke. Also consider teaching neighborhood children how to help make, paint, varnish the pieces.

    Fresh air outdoor games (played on painted driveways, or on two side-by-side 4×8 slabs of re-dyed carpeting, easily rolled up and stored in garage when not in use) could be a group affair, with 6-year-olds huddling (like those Concussionball players on the old tv) to decide on each move, then issuing directions to beautifully clad two-year-olds (Vanna White and Betty Black) who move each piece correctly to the named square (“Betty, please move our rookpawn to H5”), and after each move everybody applauds thus encouraging the toddlers toward future engineering careers.

    @Evening Bud, no need to give up enjoying the taste of beer, often I find an ounce or two abandoned in a recyclable can in the garbage and enjoy it on the spot (aint afraid of germs, cannabis gives me good immune factors), the alcohol marketeers haven’t got a penny off me in 30 years.

    Or I pour left-over beer, pop, icecream etc. into a wide-mouth juicebottle and carry it home to the blender to non-overdose-flavorize mostly raw-veggie smoothies. For such use also consider making a little batch of your own beer or wine now and then, something vapetokers can do to express that Creative Paranoia energy.

  25. @mexweed – Dude – drinking leftover beer is something that should probably be prohibited! 🙂

    And all you people that put your beers in the recycle bin before finishing them should “think of the children”. After all, some people say it is a gateway drug…

  26. I note as Keith pointed out, legal herb now already polls higher in swing states than the Cruz-Christie Cross of Christ Campaign Caravan. So maybe we NORMLizers should concentrate not on fighting the ol’ legalization battle but on reforming usage to help legalized cannabis block out deadly drug dosage practices like tabakaholism.

    @Miles, which side are you on? Do you see salvaging beer leftovers defeats our enemy(the “industry”)’s objective of $$elling a whole new 12-ouncer to every germophobe sucker that wants “a drink” from which they’d throw away a few ounces anyway (contaminating the recycle bin). In this way we cut off some funding otherwise funneled to flunkyass lawmakers to keep cannabis illegal.

  27. Mexweed, I appreciate the tip, but alcohol of any sort gives me terrible headaches these days. Guess I developed an allergy to it.

    Miles, I “think of the children” every time I walk past the beer display without stopping and getting a 6-pak. Wouldn’t want them to turn into little “hop” heads.

  28. @mexweed – I’m pretty sure we’re on the same side! Perhaps, in a more enlightened time (hopefully within the next 5 years or so), we could get together to discuss it further after a toke or two 🙂

  29. sorry i am a bit off topic but i wish to know, concerning drug testing in the workplace, do companies receive some sort of tax break or benefit from the government for drug testing employees? i wish documented evidence to fuel a fire that has been brewing with my employers h.r. staff. they tell us their is no incentive from the government to spend all that money to hair test at will. i call bullshit but have no hardcopy. any direction is appreciated…pack a bowl for me! and, thank you norml for all you are doing for the cause of the remedy!

  30. So glad to see the tides of change finally getting around to this really great medicinal herb, paper and cotton substitute, best rope, etc., etc. However, I have noticed that all this “legal” herb has some fancy name, and is mostly GMO pot, created by scientists working for big money that runs these shops, grows the GMO herb, and is making billions of dollars. Which is the American way isn’t it? and hey, we do get to buy and smoke herb legally, in some places. But I read an article/post on the net that stated the mj farmers in Mexico, were being paid 40-60 per pound; but now with some legalization, it has dropped to around $30-40. Now how does that affect pot in this country? Not much so far as I can see, but these hard working farmers, located around the world, in some of the poorest areas, could be making decent money for their families if their products, naturally grown, since they can’t afford the expensive chemicals this country and others use to keep the plants thriving, could be sent to any number of immerging legalized marijuana nations, including ours. I applaud the use of tax money to help the schools, first responders and others; but I used to live in Florida and they, the state, said the same thing when they wanted the lotto. Just would like to see someone use this change in attitudes and knowledge to help these third world countries and others grow a cash crop that helps people all the way around.

  31. I have always been a true believer for this as an all around cure all medicine that works better than any prescription meds available for pain and I will support it til my death. I believe that God has given this to us for many purposes and it should not be anyone’s decision to make it against the law to use.

  32. Most drugs of abuse suppress neurogenesis Only Cannabis promotes Neurogenesis
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051014073523.htm

    Cannabinoids as Antioxidants and Neuroprotectants
    http://yournewswire.com/us-government-patent-on-marijuana-for-treating-disease-discovered/

    Patents on Cannabis Curing Cancer
    http://www.infowars.com/u-s-government-owns-patent-on-cannabis/

    Cannabis and Neurogenesis
    http://www.truthonpot.com/2013/03/30/marijuana-and-neurogenesis-whats-it-all-about

  33. I agreed with many of the others with regard to legalizing Canabis . I’m not against it because those whom I had talked to informed me that it is good for treating pain, not just minor pain but those people suffering with severe pain of the back, neck, legs , and arms . Those with such pain that they can barely do anything for themselves . My wife has such a need for this treatment for her pain . The medication that she takes barely goes to the pain . She has two back surgeries and a neck surgery . The older she gets the worst the pain. As medical use I support legalizing canabis

  34. While I agree that smoking weed does confer some unique benefits, the negatives far outweigh the positives.

    I am also suspicious when “big brother” gets on the bandwagon of legalizing drugs. From my perspective all drugs should be legal just like alcohol.

    I remember what singer Bob Marley once said, it is laws that create crime and violence.

    [Editor’s note: Cannabis negatives far outweigh the positives.

    ?

    Um…alcohol has laws, regulations and taxes.]

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